Any security software is vulnerable if its virus signature database is not up-to-date, which might result in infections of the hosting system.

Implementors should be aware that the software represents the user in their interactions over the Internet, and should be careful to allow the user to be aware of any actions they might take which may have an unexpected significance to themselves or others.

In particular, the convention has been established that the GET and HEAD methods SHOULD NOT have the significance of taking an action other than retrieval. This allows user agents to represent other methods, such as POST, PUT and DELETE, in a special way, so that the user is made aware of the fact that a possibly unsafe action is being requested.

Naturally, it is not possible to ensure that the server does not generate side-effects as a result of performing a GET request; in fact, some dynamic resources consider that a feature.

' to get specific options for different Symantec programs, which enables them to avoid deploying all the updates.

The set of common methods for HTTP/1.1 is defined below.

Although this set can be expanded, additional methods cannot be assumed to share the same semantics for separately extended clients and servers.

The Host request-header field (section 14.23) MUST accompany all HTTP/1.1 requests.

You just have to make sure you get the right package for your system's architecture (32 or 64-bit) and Symantec product version (see below).

The Symantec Intelligent Updater requires no user feedback, as you just have to launch it and wait for the definitions to be installed.