The format of the original series was simple: a bachelorette would have three minutes to ask the same set of questions to each of three hidden bachelors, and then select one bachelor as her "date" based strictly on their responses.

According to Pew Research Center's Internet Project, 10 percent of 18-to-24-year-olds and 8 percent of 45-to-54-year-olds have done online dating. singles said the main advantages of online dating are to "expand my dating pool" (94 percent) and "allows me to pre-screen my dates" (93 percent), according to

Researchers explain that middle-aged adults represent a "thin dating market"--in other words, dating prospects are slim within their immediate social circles. Other common reasons for using online dating sites or apps include "meeting people who share similar interests or hobbies" (60 percent); "meeting people who share your beliefs or values" (52 percent); "finding someone for a long-term relationship or marriage" (46 percent); and "having a schedule that makes it hard to meet interesting people in other ways" (33 percent), according to a Pew report.

If you're not an online dater, you probably know someone who is.

According to a Pew survey, almost half (42 percent) of Americans know an online dater, while slightly more than a quarter (29 percent) know someone who found a spouse or formed a long-term relationship through online dating.

While cyber courtships are on the rise, most people still meet their mate or partner offline.

Only 5 percent of people who are married or in a committed relationship met their significant other online.

However, the mating paradigm is shifting: the share of Internet users who met their mate online has doubled, from 3 percent in 2005 to 6 percent in 2010.

Thanks to the Internet and social networking sites like Facebook, online dating has become an unstoppable juggernaut.

Consider Match.com, an online dating industry pioneer. Around that time, only 14 percent of American adults were internet users.