Ultimately, the agent and Gallegos arranged a meeting outside a school in Sandy.

At some point, Gallegos said he was convinced the person was a gay man posing as a girl because in the past he had arranged meetings with supposed females only to meet a man.

The reason he showed up at the meeting site, was out of curiosity about this person.

In an attempt to have the charge thrown out, 3rd District Judge Stephen Henroid ruled that it didn't matter that Gallegos showed up at the meeting site and that the crime was completed over the Internet.

Can the state convict someone of enticing a minor over the Internet based on their words alone?

That issue was the subject of lively debate among justices of the Utah Supreme Court on Wednesday.

At issue is whether or not Utah's Internet Enticement statute is unconstitutional by saying a person engaged in sexual speech over the Internet need only believe they are chatting with a minor in order to be convicted. justice system a person is considered innocent until the state can prove their guilt.

"All you're doing is criminalizing speech," said attorney Ann Taliaferro. Even if a suspect outright confesses to a crime, the state must show independent evidence that they either committed the crime or intended to commit a crime.

Taliaferro said in her client's case, he was convicted based solely on an Internet chat he claims was purely sexual fantasy.

James Gallegos, of Clearfield, was charged and convicted by a jury of enticing a 13-year-old girl over the Internet. In actuality, the 13-year-old was an adult agent with the Utah Attorney General's Internet Crimes Against Children task force.